Archive for the ‘Tomorrow’s Practice Today’ Category

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Eye-dropper bottle evolves

September 25, 2013
An older male patient demonstrates use of the Whisper eyedrop device.

An older male patient demonstrates use of the Whisper eyedrop device.

By Geoffrey W. Goodfellow, O.D., and Dominick M. Maino, O.D.

The instillation of ocular pharmaceuticals has been around for more than 100 years. From diagnostic agents we instill in the office, to prescription pharmaceuticals patients administer themselves, very little has changed about the delivery mechanism over the years. Read the rest of this entry ?

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3-D printing and optometry: ‘Doctor, can you print my glasses now?’

August 28, 2013
Dutch technology development firm LUXeXceL Group announced June 20 it had produced the world’s first fully 3-D-printed functional eyewear (with both lenses and frames produced through the 3-D printing process) and presented them as a gift to Dutch King Willem Alexander and Queen Maxim. LUXeXcel emphasized the eyeglasses shown here represent a first proof of concept for the laser printing of eyewear. Company officials note the product is not ready for market, and it does not yet have a business model in place; however, they consider the process ”very promising.”

Dutch technology development firm LUXeXceL Group announced June 20 it had produced the world’s first fully 3-D-printed functional eyewear (with both lenses and frames produced through the 3-D printing process) and presented them as a gift to Dutch King Willem Alexander and Queen Maxim. LUXeXcel emphasized the eyeglasses shown here represent a first proof of concept for the laser printing of eyewear. Company officials note the product is not ready for market, and it does not yet have a business model in place; however, they consider the process ”very promising.”

By Dominick M. Maino, O.D., and Geoffrey W. Goodfellow, O.D.

It was the year 2020. Our patient previously completed an at-home self-refraction (she emailed us the results), so we had some preliminary information on what the power of her glasses might be. After verifying this, we completed a full comprehensive eye and vision examination moments later. At the end of this evaluation, the patient than asked, “Doctor, can you print my new glasses now?”

Science fact or science fiction?

Printing in 3-D is a manufacturing technique resulting in the creation of a real-world object by placing material in layers using an additive methodology.

Over the last year, 3-D printing has been frequently in the news with stories about printing working guns (3-D-printed guns may face regulations” on CNET news [http://tinyurl.com/CNET3Dprint] and the “Dawn of a Revolution, How 3D Printing will Change the World Dawn of a Revolution” feature on CNN [http://tinyurl.com/ CNN3Dprint] and several YouTube videos [http://tinyurl.com/YouTube3Dprint]).

New York University even offers a course on 3-D printing (http://tinyurl.com/ NYU3Dprintcourse). Read the rest of this entry ?

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Artificial vision

August 13, 2013

tomorrow 3By Geoffrey W. Goodfellow, O.D., and Dominick M. Maino, O.D.

Like many facets of eye care, technology is changing the way we practice optometry.

Particularly in the area of low vision, the abundance of inexpensive computing power and applications targeted to patients with visual impairment has really expanded what we can offer. Read the rest of this entry ?

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High-tech, low-tech and concussion!

July 11, 2013

King-Devick Test Kit_edited-1By Geoffrey W. Goodfellow, O.D., and Dominick M. Maino, O.D.

Patients who have experienced a traumatic brain injury (TBI) or concussion often experience numerous eye and vision abnormalities. These frequently include binocular vision, accommodative and oculomotor dysfunctions, as well as vision information processing disorders and numerous pathological sequelae. It is important for AOA members to ensure their patients are aware of the risks and signs of concussion associated with sports and how technology is helping in the areas of on-field safety and diagnosis of this life-threatening disorder. Read the rest of this entry ?

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Automated pupillometers: Not just for eye care professionals

May 24, 2013
NeurOptics NPi-100 pupillometer

NeurOptics NPi-100 pupillometer

By Geoffrey W. Goodfellow, O.D., and Dominick M. Maino, O.D.

Automated handheld equipment can be an important resource for optometrists in gathering information about patients’ vision and health. Such devices are particularly helpful in working with children or patients who have physical limitations in aligning their head inside more traditional table-top instrumentation. Many eye care professionals already rely on automated devices to measure such things as intraocular pressure, blood pressure, or refractive error. Now, a new generation of handheld automated pupillometers is proving useful in evaluating both eye problems and systemic conditions from head trauma to Parkinson’s. Read the rest of this entry ?