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Hoya, PPG host roundtable on pediatric vision

August 28, 2013
Participants of the “Engaging With Today’s Parents to Promote Pediatric Vision” roundtable met on June 28, during Optometry's Meeting® in San Diego, Calif. to identify important factors to consider when recommending eyeglasses for kids. From left are Greg Hicks, O.D., Elizabeth Christensen, O.D., Ann-Marie Lahr, O.D. (moderator and director of education at Hoya Vision Care), Glen T. Steele, O.D., Paul Alan Harris, O.D., and Barney Dougher, president of HOYA Vision Care, North America.

Participants of the “Engaging With Today’s Parents to Promote Pediatric Vision” roundtable met on June 28, during Optometry’s Meeting® in San Diego, Calif. to identify important factors to consider when recommending eyeglasses for kids. From left are Greg Hicks, O.D., Elizabeth Christensen, O.D., Ann-Marie Lahr, O.D. (moderator and director of education at Hoya Vision Care), Glen T. Steele, O.D., Paul Alan Harris, O.D., and Barney Dougher, president of HOYA Vision Care, North America.

Prompted by research showing that parents desire more education on lens options and eyewear care, Hoya Vision Care North America and PPG Industries hosted a professional roundtable on “Engaging With Today’s Parents to Promote Pediatric Vision” during Optometry’s Meeting® in San Diego, Calif.

The roundtable included a panel of optometrists who each have decades of experience in treating kids.

During the roundtable, participants identified important factors to consider when recommending eyeglasses for kids, including reactions from children and their parents.

Discussions also included issues related to eyewear care and compliance, the connection between eye health and overall health and the role of vision in classroom performance and behavior.

“We all know that kids’ eyewear needs are different from those of adults, and that parents’ perspectives often influence how well those needs are met,” said Ann-Marie Lahr, O.D., director of education at Hoya Vision Care and moderator for the event. “That’s why it’s essential for optometrists to engage parents. They control how often children visit an eye doctor, and help enforce standards for using and caring for eyewear after the appointment.”

During the roundtable, results from a national consumer survey commissioned by PPG helped spark conversation about how to engage parents and kids on eyewear care and compliance.

The survey, conducted in March 2012, found that despite 78 percent of respondents saying they think their children understand the importance of taking care of their eyeglasses, the majority of parents have noticed issues suggesting the opposite.

The most common eyeglass care problems parents noticed in their children that were corroborated by the roundtable panelists were: dropping their eyeglasses (66 percent), taking them off with one hand (55 percent), wiping them with fingers or a shirt (55 percent) and not using a case when not wearing them (54 percent).

These results suggest the need for more education. In fact, only 41 percent of respondents said they were very satisfied with the amount of education their eye care professional provided to their child on the proper way to care for their eyeglasses, suggesting that more than half felt their eye care professionals could have done more.

Roundtable participants included:

  • Elizabeth Christensen, O.D., fellow, College of Optometrists in Vision Development
  • Paul Alan Harris, O.D., associate professor, Southern College of Optometry
  • Greg Hicks, O.D., Family Eye Care Centers, assistant clinical professor, The Ohio State University College of Optometry
  • Glen T. Steele, O.D., professor of pediatric optometry, Southern College of Optometry, and chair of the AOA InfantSEE® Committee.

“Hopefully the roundtable and research results will serve as a reminder of the importance of not only prescribing the best eyewear for kids, but also providing instruction to both kids and parents on how to keep it performing well,” said Dr. Lahr.

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